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Homeopathy has a proven track record of treating and preventing serious epidemic diseases. It’s used by governments for dengue fever, leptospirosis, epidemic fever, malaria, and Japanese encephalitis epidemics, and, historically, for other serious contagious diseases.
 superstition lying medicine health cure homeopathy deception dishonesty pseudoscience healing petition
Over 3,000 idiots and counting. This is the intersection of Hanlon’s Razor with Clarke’s third law: any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice.
 superstition lying medicine health cure homeopathy deception dishonesty pseudoscience healing petition
But when a technical glitch meant no winning entrant could be selected, a member of the production team asked a girl visiting the studio with her parent to pose as a winning caller. She was given the correct answer and put on air.

2007-07-09

 BBC quizz competition radio deception
All we can ever know are the guesses or interpretations our mind creates about what is going on. To create these guesses, we can only draw on basic human neuroanatomy and on our past experience. Since no two people ever have exactly the same neuroanatomy or experience, no two people ever interpret anything in exactly the same way. This is frightening. It means that each of us lives alone, in our own world of meaning.

2010-06-21

 lying psychology deception reality neuroscience meaning understanding uncertainty truth
This failure to notice what should be very apparent is something we unconsciously experience every day as our brains filter the barrage of visual information which we are flooded with. And apparently it has a name; it is called change blindness.

2010-06-11

 change blindness psychology perception brain neuroscience cognition artificial intelligence deception advertisement attention recognition
Our ability to project a picture of ourselves in other people's minds may be down to a distinct form of brain activity, according to a report...
 brain neuroscience deception psychology toread
If I were a con artist, I’d get in the habit of buying people warm drinks. If that didn’t work, I’d start conducting my con in warm rooms, or maybe move to a tropical region. Why? Because fleeting feelings of heat increase our willingness to trust strangers. That, at least, is the conclusion of a clever new paper from the Bargh lab, which measured the effect of temperature on interpersonal interactions. It’s yet another reminder that even...

2010-11-30

 psychology perception brain cognition deception manipulation trust temperature warm